Western & Southern Open Kids Day returns after three-year hiatus


The Western and Southern Open once again welcomed the world’s greatest tennis back to the Linder family tennis center in Mason. For the first time since 2019, the tournament opened with the drills and thrills of KIDS Day. Maki’Lah Lucas and hundreds of other area youngsters got to learn the fundamentals of tennis and be coached in the basics of the game in the shadows of the world’s greatest tennis.“It’s wonderful to be here to see my idols. I’m having a great experience and today I’m with Never the Less,” Maki’Lah said. Jim Amick of The Western and Southern Open was glad to welcome the young players. “It’s such a great opportunity to come out and give our young friends the opportunity to try tennis activities on the court and really introduce them to the sport for a lifetime,” Amick said. The action was fast passed and the games were fun for these young players, developing the skills that might one day take them to center court. On the other side of the net, the big serves of the game’s most famous players echoed and inspired. “This is one of the greatest tournaments in the country and the world for that matter. All the players embrace being here with the kids, signing autographs, and just being a part of the whole event,” Amick said. Youth Tennis teams from across the city and the region took in the big serves, learning that maybe one day they may volley with the best. Christa Akahoun plays for The Inner City Tennis Project.“Y ou never know you can see tennis players that come to Cincinnati. It’s not every day you see this level of player in Cincinnati,” Akahoun said. Long-time coach Rachel Fair has mentored generations of youth and college players. Since 1986, Fair has helped young players serve up success on and off the court.” It’s just wonderful that they can see the progression of juniors who have started, and this is as far as you can go,” said Fair. Watching Venus Williams, many of these young players say they are inspired. They say the road that led Venus and her sister Serena from Compton California to Center Court at Wimbledon, may be passing through Cincinnati.

The Western and Southern Open once again welcomed the world’s greatest tennis back to the Linder family tennis center in Mason. For the first time since 2019, the tournament opened with the drills and thrills of KIDS Day.

Maki’Lah Lucas and hundreds of other area youngsters got to learn the fundamentals of tennis and be coached in the basics of the game in the shadows of the world’s greatest tennis.

“It’s wonderful to be here to see my idols. I’m having a great experience and today I’m with Never the Less,” Maki’Lah said.

Jim Amick of The Western and Southern Open was happy to welcome the young players.

“It’s such a great opportunity to come out and give our young friends the opportunity to try tennis activities on the court and really introduce them to the sport for a lifetime,” Amick said.

The action was fast passed and the games were fun for these young players, developing the skills that might one day take them to center court.

On the other side of the net, the big serves of the game’s most famous players echoed and inspired.

“This is one of the greatest tournaments in the country and the world for that matter. All the players embrace being here with the kids, signing autographs, and just being a part of the whole event,” Amick said.

Youth Tennis teams from across the city and the region took in the big serves, learning that maybe one day they may volley with the best.

Christa Akahoun plays for The Inner City Tennis Project.

“You never know you can see tennis players that come to Cincinnati. It’s not every day you see this level of player in Cincinnati,” Akahoun said.

Long-time coach Rachel Fair has mentored generations of youth and college players. Since 1986, Fair has helped young players serve up success on and off the court.

“It’s just wonderful that they can see the progression of juniors who have started, and this is as far as you can go,” said Fair.

Watching Venus Williams, many of these young players say they are inspired. They say the road that led Venus and her sister Serena from Compton California to Center Court at Wimbledon, may be passing through Cincinnati.

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